What are the types of no balls in Cricket? – Powerful 15 Methods

No ball is signalled when the bowler has made an illegal delivery of the ball to the batsman. Let us see what are the types of no balls in cricket? in this article. When the ball has been bowled, but the umpire signalled it as a no-ball, in that situation, most methods of dismissal, like run-out, LBW, or caught, will not be considered. 

There are five kinds of extras in cricket: no balls, wides, byes, leg byes, and penalties. Among these extras, let’s read about the rules of no ball and what are the different types of no balls in cricket as follows:

What are the Rules for no-ball in cricket? 

When no ball is bowled, an extra run will be added to the batting team’s score, but not to an individual batsman who is currently playing. 

In limited formats like one-day matches and t20 matches, if no-ball was bowled, the bowler should bowl again, and the next ball is a free hit. Free hit means that the batsman can be given out when no ball is bowled. But in some circumstances, like running out, stumping or hitting the ball twice, it will still be considered as out. 

What are the types of no balls in cricket?

There are fifteen types of no balls in cricket in total. Let’s have a look at all those different kinds of no-ball one by one as follows:

#1 Front foot no-ball rules:

When a ball bowled is called front-foot no-ball, it means no part of the foot of the bowler was behind the popping crease. A popping crease is a line parallel to the stumps and four feet away from the stumps approximately. 

In order for the no-ball to be considered legal, at least a part of the foot of the bowler should be behind the popping crease at the time of bowling the ball. When bowling, if the umpire sees the bowler’s foot sliding the crease after landing, it cannot be named as no ball because some part of the foot of the bowler was behind the popping crease at the time of the bowling.

#2 Back foot no-ball rules:

Next up on our list of “what are the types of no balls in cricket” is back foot no-ball. There are two lines on the field, known as return crease, on either side of the wicket. Return crease lines intersect at the point where both bowling and popping creases meet at the right angles. That particular area is the designated area for the bowler to deliver the ball. When a ball bowled is called back foot no-ball, it means the trailing foot of the deliverer cuts the return crease when releasing the ball. 

#3 Full toss no ball rules:

Next up on our list of “what are the types of no balls in cricket” is full toss no-ball. When a ball bowled is called full toss no ball or waist height no-ball, it means that full toss is delivered above the waist height of the batsman. If the umpires who are umpiring the match felt dangerous about these kinds of beamers, they have the right to debar the bowler in accordance with the safety of the batsman. Beamers mean continuous bowling of two waist height no-balls in a row. 

#4 No ball for ball bouncing over the head:

When a bowler is bowling a ball, and when that ball has passed over the head of the batsman or could have passed over the head of the batsman, then the umpire can declare it as a no-ball. 

#5 No ball for ball bouncing multiple times:

When a ball bowled by the bowler bounced more than once before reaching the batsman, it is considered a no-ball. It is declared a no-ball when a ball rolls through the surface before reaching the batsman at the popping crease. 

#6 No ball for delivery pitching outside the play area:

When the bowler makes a delivery, but it pitches out of the play area partially or completely before reaching the batsman, it is considered a no-ball.

#7 No ball for bowler breaking wickets while delivering the ball:

When a ball is being bowled, but the non-striker batsman has not been dismissed yet or leaves the crease, it can be considered a no-ball. Under the circumstances, like any clothes or objects that fall onto the stumps, while the ball is being bowled and breaks the wickets, it is a no-ball.

#8 No ball for balls throwing:

Next up on our list of “what are the types of no balls in cricket” is delivering the ball by throwing. As per the rules and regulations of cricket law, it is permissible for the bowlers to extend their arm/ elbow only to 15 degrees. And above that is considered illegal. So when a bowler delivers the ball, they should not straighten the bowling arm beyond the above limit. Extending the arm above the permitted limit would be considered bowling the no-ball. 

#9 No ball for delivering underarm:

Next up on our list of “what are the types of no balls in cricket” is delivering the ball underarm. When a bowler bowls a ball in lob bowling or underarm bowling, then it is considered illegal. So thereby, stating the obvious, it is declared as no-ball. 

#10 No ball for throwing the ball towards the batsman before delivery:

When a bowler throws the ball at the batsman, the umpire can indeed deem it the no-ball before reaching his delivery stride.

#11 No ball for failure to notify the umpires of the mode of delivery:

The bowler needs to inform the umpire about his way of bowling, whether right-handed or left-handed or pace or spin or over or around the wicket. Failing to do so is considered a no-ball. 

#12 No ball for fielder intercepting the delivery:

Next up on our list of “what are the types of no balls in cricket” is the fielder intercepting the delivery. When a ball is bowled, it should not reach any fielder before reaching the batsman or his bat or passes above the stump; then, it is declared a no-ball. 

#13 No ball for breaching the number of fielders on the onside:

No more than three fielders, including the wicket-keeper, should be placed on the square leg side of the fielding area. If breaking this law, then it is considered as no-ball by the umpire. 

#14 No ball for delivery coming to rest before reaching the batsman:

When the bowler makes a delivery, the ball should reach the batsman or bat first but should not come to rest in front of the batsman. By doing so, it is declared a no-ball by the umpire. 

#15 No ball if the wicket-keeper is in front of the stumps:

When a ball is bowled, the wicket-keeper should not cross the stumps before reaching the batsman. Once the bowler has delivered the ball, the wicket-keeper’s position should be behind the stumps. It will be a no-ball if the wicket-keeper comes in front of the stumps or lines with them before reaching the batsman. If the batsman has attempted to run, the wicket-keeper can cross the stumps to collect the ball. 

Conclusion:

The umpire must watch the bowlers very carefully to notice whether these kinds of bowling are made accidentally or intentionally. If it seemed accidental, then the bowler should be warned. If he continues to bowl another ball the same as before, he should be removed from the attack. If this kind of rigorous bowling seemed intentional initially, the bowler should be removed from the attack without any warning beforehand. So, by reading the above blog post regarding what are the types of no balls in cricket, we hope it knowledgeably helped you. 

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